Add some spice :)

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  • #3018
    Avatardoc
    Participant

    For those that might struggle with creativity in USRPT. Maybe try this.

    I did this this morning with a couple of our 50m free guys, all under 23 seconds, and it was interesting the feedback they had. I personally think it gave them something to think about other than “I have to be at tempo and cycle” it created just enough of a different feel to the 25s and may have kept them more engaged.

    I will tell you they swam fast! About .21 faster than average and for 25s that is a huge difference!

    Attached is the study the idea came from.


    ? I child proofed my house and they still get in 🙂

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    #3020
    Avatardmuecke
    Participant

    Did you let your swimmers exhale and hold their breath and swim supra maximal as mentioned in the study or did they swim maximal? I’m going to try this with my swimmers tomorrow.

    #3021
    Avatardoc
    Participant

    They really have to focus. It’s against all instinct to exhale before dropping underwater and will take them a few attempts to figure it out.

    Somethings we’ve done in the past is:

    1. Large LEGO blocks and sink to the bottom and see how many you can put together on one exhale. After a couple attempts they get pretty good at it. Had some guys that go get all 28 stacked.

    2. No LEGO blocks. Go to the hardware store and buy some 4″-5″, 1/2 or greater bolts with about 3 washers each and nuts. Scatter them over the bottom of the pool and tell them “you get one breath and put them together” The kicker is you have to “exhale” first 🙂

    What you see is we’re real comfortable in the first 18 inches of water. But after that not so comfortable. I did this at a clinic and had some pretty good swimmers not even come close to putting the bolts, washer and nuts together.

    I have them exhale and get to the 25m mark as fast as they can. Which is very close to “n x 25 on 2:00” and they are 25s on 1:00. We try not to “clutter” things. Just swim fast. I think that as coaches we think we have to give them ALL the information or we’re not coaching. Just let them “rip” and see happens.

    Did it again with a breaststroker this am and the kid went crazy! Had to hold 15.00, on 25s on 1:00 and was holding 14.66 avg with stdev .13.

    I really think it distracts/feels different enough that they “just swim”

    This is now the “ART” of coaching (based on some science :)).

    Keep playing with it and let us know what you see.


    ? I child proofed my house and they still get in 🙂

    #3022
    AvatarMarlin
    Participant

    This is really interesting. It’s interesting that they would drop time right away without having to go through multiple sessions and have a training effect take place. I tried this on Sunday at the end of practice. I was too tired to do full 25’s but I just did underwaters timed with the tempo trainer. I did them on 3.5 alternating inhaled and exhaled. I was surfacing right at 3.5 and looked at where I was on the lane rope right at the beep. It was kind of hard to tell but I think I may have gotten a tiny bit further on the exhaled reps. I ended up getting a calf cramp on an exhaled rep and I had to stop. I rarely get cramps.

    For sprint breaststroke a long time ago, I experimented with doing no breathers, at least through the first 25 of a 50. I would take a full inhale on the start though. On a 25 sprint, I was faster by .1-2 than breathing every stroke. It was a normal stroke, I didn’t keep my face in the water or anything like that, I just didn’t breathe on the recovery. I think it allowed me to be a little bit quicker on the recovery portion of the stroke and helped me maintain a quick tempo. Even though you try to take a quick breath I think most swimmers sacrifice a little time on the breath during sprint. I think not breathing made my tempo faster but I had the same dps. If you think about it, if I had a tempo of .02 faster than with breathing and had the same dps, I would get to the wall .16-.2 faster on 8-10 strokes. I had forgotten about this and am going to try doing this again. Thanks for the reminder Doc! The faster recovery with the same dps could be part of the reason why you breaststroker went so fast on those 25’s.

    #3062
    Avatardmuecke
    Participant

    After reading the post from @doc I added 3 times a week hypoxia training into the workouts. My group consists of 8-12yo swimmers. I also tested hypoxia training with a triathlete. Hypoxia training set was 12-16x25F at 200F pace 20s rest with exhale-hold breath technique.
    After the hypoxia training swimmers had some rest followed by one USRPT set.

    We had a swim meet the weekend before I started with hypoxia training so I used the race times as a starting point. Last weekend was our last swim meet for the saison. Race times from there have been compared with the first meet. I have found an improvement of 1.96% for the swim group.
    The performance improvement from the group was better than another group in the same club which didn’t use hypoxia and USRPT training but went to the same swim meets. Details of my group can be found in the attached file.
    Triathlon race times are hard to compare but I could find some competitors in the same races and tried to asses if there are any positive affects with hypoxia training. The improvement for the triathlete was better than the swim group’s improvement.

    Hypoxia training might be beneficial if you use the exhale-hold technique. Based on my findings parts of the improvement of my group could be related to this kind of training. If you look for scientific proof I would recommend to order the book from here http://www.hypoventilation-training.com/.

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